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Tiger3
01-12-2011, 04:11 PM
Do any coaches out there grade players/game film? If so, how do you do it? What do you do with the results? Do you tell the players their grades then move on? Do you have any penalty for low grade (i.e anyone scoring less than 70 does extra conditioning), do you grade just assignment or does anyone grade technique or effort. I am looking for a way to make better use of game film, be more efficient as a staff, and better our players.

Chuck Klausing
01-12-2011, 11:11 PM
I always used a plus and minus sytem on grading each player. At times we would grade their block on a 1 to 10 system. 10 was a perfect block. I believe I have and attachment on this.
E mail me at clkb5401@comcast.net and ask for blocking grade.
Chuck Klausing

BlueDarter
01-13-2011, 09:00 AM
My take on this is somewhat different.

In high school, most teams have no depth. On the OL for example (the group most commonly graded) we have maybe six, at most seven, guys that can play in a game and not get us killed. So if I "grade" them and give our guys 47, 51, 22 but they still start, what does that say?

You suck but we don't have anyone better, LOL.

We watch the film and go over every play, every step, every block together. And then we repeat it at practice, areas we need work. But to have my OL coach grade it out and post it is not the best use of time in my opinion.

My HS coach (coach of the century in FL) never watched film with his teams. He told me, "They know what they did wrong right there Friday night as soon as they did it. Why repeat it for them in class on Monday?"

Good point.

Go ahead, blast away, LOL.

carolinacoach
01-13-2011, 10:16 AM
My take on this is somewhat different.

In high school, most teams have no depth. On the OL for example (the group most commonly graded) we have maybe six, at most seven, guys that can play in a game and not get us killed. So if I "grade" them and give our guys 47, 51, 22 but they still start, what does that say?

You suck but we don't have anyone better, LOL.

We watch the film and go over every play, every step, every block together. And then we repeat it at practice, areas we need work. But to have my OL coach grade it out and post it is not the best use of time in my opinion.

My HS coach (coach of the century in FL) never watched film with his teams. He told me, "They know what they did wrong right there Friday night as soon as they did it. Why repeat it for them in class on Monday?"

Good point.

Go ahead, blast away, LOL.


Coach,

I agree. I think film can be "overwatched" by players. We show them or more often than not just tell them and show on the field what they did wrong and start working for the next week. I have been on staffs where they eat up a whole practice on film. I have always felt we need "more practice" and less film :)

JWright
01-13-2011, 10:52 AM
Coach
We do not grade our players, but I am probably one of the few that believes that film is VERY IMPORTANT for your players to watch. Especially of themselves. Therefore:

1.We videotape practice.
This was something suggested to me by college colleague and it has helped out immeasurably. We will take time after practice to allow our players to watch themselves and we cover correctable mistakes only. Because team time lasts only 20-30 minutes it does not take long to cover stuff. Some days we just watch a segment:
7 on 7
Inside run

2. After game day:
Our players lift and then go to group. I agree that this can be overdone and therefore we have the players watchthe film with their coach for correctable mistakes only and no grading. This process takes about an hour.

3. Opponents film
Mon: One hour after practice
We break down our opponents film into:
Runs
Outside Runs
Passes
Play-action
Tricks
Then we watch each segment. When they see the same play in several clips in a row they get a real sense of the play. We also teach them little cues that to watch for as well:
Stance
Depth
Alignments

When not to watch film:
1. The opponent is so bad you do not want your kids to get over confident.
2. The opponent is so good you do not want your kids to be intimidated.
Hope this helps
Coach Wright
FINAL NOTE
We accomplish this with Apex video editing software.

CoachSchelb
01-13-2011, 11:13 AM
Coach Wright,

What do you show your offense of the opposing defense?

JWright
01-13-2011, 02:09 PM
Coach
We spend time with the QB's on opposing defense and that is it.
WHY?
Secondary Leverage
Trigger Reads
Front recognition
These are the two keys to our QB checks from the LOS, so we want to make sure that we are on the same page.
Coach Wright

fred
01-13-2011, 02:33 PM
Our players can get a +, an A (Missed Alignment/Assignment), T (Bad Technique), or an E (Lack of effort). This allows both the player and the coach and me as a head coach where we are struggling. It eliminates the we graded out at 50% on the O-Line we must suck and makes it We were bad with Technique on the Oline so we really need to focus our indy time there a little better.

Also when a player wants to know why they aren't getting more PT we can look at grades and have something tangible to show them.

eriewingt
01-13-2011, 03:48 PM
We don't grade, I think it's a waste of time. I am sure at some levels of HS it could be benefical and in the higher levels of football it has a place. But for us it's a waste of time. We watch our game film as a staff at our meetings to look for mistakes and why plays were not successful. The we will watch the film with the team every week and make the necessary corrections. I just feel grades do not convey enough information to the player to make it worth while. I mean your tackle could grade out at 87% but may have missed their block everytime you ran bucksweep that week, so the player looks at it and says hey 87% that's pretty good! To bad you couldn't run a base play to his side though!

As coach Wright pointed out to if you can film and watch practice that is a huge asset. We film our practices during camp and two-a-days with a nice behind the line angel from a scissors lift. When we are at camp we can watch the film anytime and get the players together to watch each practice. It's great to have the assets to do that esp. early when we are inserting everything.

goboro99
01-13-2011, 06:35 PM
I'm with the non-graders, but just finally came to that realization. I never graded, then in 2008 took a job as a DC at one of the bigger schools in our state. We graded and it helped. However, I had 40 players who only played defense. Lots of depth and it helped us decide who was the starter.
I left and took my current job at a 2A school, less than half the students. We graded my first two years. I won't ever put my staff through that again. We had 30 total varsity players. If one of my starters got a bad grade, there wasn't much we could do about it other than coach him up.
I just got done reading Coach Johnston's book 101 little things to help build a program. He mentions in the book the same issues mentioned in other posts. He also points out what an amazing time consumption for no reason. You are better off putting that time into preparing for your next game.
Next year we will note the mistakes and issues. Give the kids a general sheet with things we need to work on, then make sure we are doing the functional drills in practice to fix the issues.
Just my opinion!

SDFBwingt
01-14-2011, 10:03 AM
We go through 2 offensive series each game... chart each position and what they did good and what they need improvement on... positive approach.... then we decide as a group what needs to be improved upon with the players.... we list 4 goals each week and look to improve on those for the next game... simple and each kid knows what they are good at and what needs improvement.

runtheball
01-14-2011, 12:00 PM
We grade film as follows:
1. things you did well
2. Things you need to improve.

We organzie practice around #2.

I feel it is important to get it in writing and show it to the kids. this way you can keep track and see if progress is being made between weeks, etc. I do not believe human beings can base improvement on ,"you need to do this better". SHOW ME!
If it is week 8 and I pull out week 3 grades for a particualr kid, he better not be making the same mistakes or I screwed up as a coach. We grade to be better coaches.

CoachSade
01-17-2011, 01:42 PM
Coach,

We grade offensive line film after each game and to a lesser extent after each offensive team segment in practice. The game film evaluation I use is partially from what I've always done and partially from what I got from Ole Miss at a clinic last winter. Basically, each player gets graded on each play. The grading scale is 0-4--but, a "detriment" as we call it (penalty, laziness, blown assignment) will result in minus one...so technically a player could have less than 0 on a particular play. 4 would be a distinguished block...and so on. I also do special recognition for TD blocks and pancake blocks. Once I've graded all the plays, I do an average for each player--that is his efficiency rating for that partciular game. I then do the average team efficiency rating after each game. I recognize the lineman with the best effeciency rating for each game and designate a block of the week for each game. To be honest--it takes me about 2-3 hours on Sunday to do all this...that is a bitch. But, the kids like it. It creates competition and pride. I believe it has made a positive difference in the output of our often sized offensive line. I have EXCEL and WORD templates of what I use. I'd be happy to share. Sade.paul@sgcs.k12.in.us I do use endzone camera film to grade the offensive line. That is what this grading system has been designed around. I'm not sure how easy it would be to do using a press box film. This may all sound complicated and difficult to do--but it just takes a game or 2 to get used to it. Trust me, I'm a total dumbass when it comes to math, so I made it easy for me to understand.