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Thread: Coaching Line as Off. Co

  1. Default Coaching Line as Off. Co

    Guys, I have a question for you... I am a head coach and have coached QB's the last 2 years and just lost my OLine guy. I am an OLINE guy myself so I am not worried, but I also run the offense. So my question is, "How do I coach the OLINE and run the offense too?" I know coaches do it, but I haven't done it before. Please tell me how you might run your practice or how you might split it up or any advice would help. I have some ideas, but your thoughts are appreciated, THanks!

  2. Default

    Coach you can do individual with your OL first while other coaches take the QB's, RB's, Rec's, etc.. Next, you can go group runs with the OL and offensive backs. Then group pass with everyone, working on protections with the OL and backs . Finally, team O with everyone .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    331

    Default

    Personally I think If you are going to call the plays I think the best position to coach is the O-line. You get a real feel for who can do what and the biggest communication must come from your guys up front - If I am calling plays and it is my off. I want to coach the most important part. I think as far as running practice the previous post is real good.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gainesville VA
    Posts
    28

    Default o-line

    After two years as the o coordinator and working with running backs I am also going to be coaching the offensive line this upcoming season.

    I was always frustrated not being totally in control of the line, it limited my confidence in some of the concepts we were trying to employ in the offense.

    I think the greatest impact of the move will be the positive impact on your gameplanning.

  5. #5

    Default

    Great suggestions above- here's some ways that I handled it...Alot of what you choose to do depends on your if you have a dependable position coach that you can trust to run a group drill.

    Indy time with OL - ALWAYS...positon coaches taught fundamentals...

    Group Run Period was done while Skelly was being done down the other end- I stayed with group run most of the time while the WR/QB coach ran skelly. Once in a while I'd rotate, but most time was spent run inside run.

    1 year I didn't have someone I could trust to do that, so we did Group Run while WR/DB did 1 on 1's. Then we'd get together to do Skelly/Group Pass/Blitz period- a little less effective, but sometimes you can't rely on others to run the drill properly.

    I'd take OL to do pass fundamentals during special teams- none of my fat boys should be on kickoff or punt...

    O Team everyone is together.


    My suggestion- find somebody that knows/can learn what you need done and delegate a drill like skelly to him- you can't be everywhere at once and you can't effectively get enough reps by staying in one large offensive group for every period...

  6. Default thanks

    Thanks for some of these ideas, I was kinda thinking the same thing myself, but wanted some reassurance. I would like to know how you guys break up your practices, or if you have some examples of your practice plans, that would be great. Thanks again for all of your advice!

  7. #7

    Default

    coach ever since I took over the offensive line (as a head coach) we have been more productive. I used to coach qb's but felt since I knew the wing-t
    better than my coaches, this was where my expertese was needed. I am fortunate to have a volunteer coach as an asistant. This frees me up once and awhile so I can see how the other coaches and players are doing.
    I am not the only head coach in the conference who coaches the offensive line there are at least three others whose programs are alos successful.
    go get em!

  8. #8

    Default

    I was an OC and OLine coach for two seasons. Going into it, I had the same apprehensions as many had mentioned. I found it to be a plus that I was with the line in many ways. On the other hand, I found it a disadvantage not being with the backs and QB at times. What it comes down to for me is how you organize your practice, how well you communicate your objectives to your assistants, and having good coaches. If you're comfortable with your QB coach, and he knows what you expect, and everyone is on the same page you're all set.

    The only aspect of practice I was away from the line was during 7on7. I felt I needed to be there to look over the passing game. That may be a very specific deal per my situation. I had a good assistant ol coach that I was comfortable leaving with the guys for certain drills.

    COMMUNICATION, COMMUNICATION, COMMUNICATION!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default

    What I always did was to put my quarterbacks on a regular daily routine for indy and have them execute that within eyeshot of my ol drills. Qbs should be on autopilot for the most part doing some drills consistently everyday. Daily adjustments should be done in tandem with rbs and wr. I usually have rb coach run an inside run script w/ qbs while wr coach runs skelly w/ script. Filming practices is also a plus. We usually had an injured player film all drills from a certain angle. It takes about 15 mins after practice to watch film and make corrections with your position coaches and then we tape right over it for the next practice. Hope this helps.
    Coach Tark

    gary.tarquinio@browardschools.com

  10. Default

    In my opinion, the Wing-T is by and large an offensive line's offense. The blocking is more complicated then in many other offenses (such as zone or the pro-style run games). You best offensive coach should be handling the line (IMHO).

    Thinking of it a different way, how many plays does your HB need to know? They need to know their job in each series (3-6 depending..) and pass patterns.

    Your OL has between 9-18, plus pass pro (including boots and rolls). Along with those, most teams adjust based on the front (effectively doubling or tripling that number).

    You also have 6 (or 7) starting OL (including TE's), and only 4 starting backs to prepare weekly.

    Of course there are good reasons why people shouldn't coach the OL. If you need to work the defense more or if you already have an excellent OL coach. However, I believe that if you are the best OL coach you should really coach the OL.

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