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Thread: Slide Protection

  1. #1

    Default Slide Protection

    We are going from a man scheme to slide protection in our three-step passing game this season, and I have a couple of questions for those of you that use slide protection:

    1. Generally, what are some of the finer detailed coaching points you give your o-linemen? Example: I'm a right guard with a reading 3 tech. on me. How do I handle the three tech? Will I slide to the next man over and let my center take the 3 tech.? Obviously I have some homework yet to do on slide, but I'd like to hear some good rules.

    2. Do you release four receivers into the route, with a mirrored combination taking place on both sides of the formation, assuming a 2 x 2 set? Using the slide protection, it seems to me you don't have to keep your TE in to block like we did when we man protected.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    I'm a big fan of Half-slide protection; that is zone frontside, man backside with a RB double checking LBs.

    The biggest mistake people make is not understanding that slide does not represent the footwork, but the target- the frontside is zoning 1 gap playside, looking to take whatever defender is working that gap. You may find yourself using a reach step, a jump technique, or even kickslides- depending on the defender technique. AGAIN slide protection is not a technique, it is a scheme determining who's blocking who.

    1/2 slide lets us release 4 receivers immediately into a route, with the possibility of releasing a 5th receiver and throwing hot.

    It also stands up to keeping 2 backs in for a 7 mqan protection if needed.

    Here's how we teach it:

    1) The first uncovered lineman from the center playside will have a double check technique- they will look for blitzers in PS A gap all the way out to the edge. If there is a 1 technique or a shade frontside, then the center will work him and the guard will have the "lookout" or double check.

    2) We're going big on big backside- regardless of there alignment techniques. The only thing that will change this is a "closet" call (more on that later). RB HAS DOUBLE CHECK, INSIDE OUT, CHECKING A GAP OUT...

    3) Frontside CGT are responsible for the A/B/C/D gap defenders- that is if they bring 4, we will let the widest defender come free and we throw hot.

    4) "Closet" call- a backside call that alerts RB that he is picking up 1st defender head up to outside Tackle; tackle and guard are changing the protection to full slide, protecting B/A gaps respectively. There is no need for a closet call frontside EVER...


    EXAMPLES:

    The protection call is to the right

    4-3
    ------W------M------S-----
    --------------------------
    ----E-----N-------T-----E--
    ----------------------------
    ------1--2---3---4---5-----
    ----------------------------
    --------------6-------------

    1- END
    2- NOSE
    3- CHECKING MIKE TO SAM
    4- TACKLE
    5- END
    6- WILL TO ANY BLITZER BACKSIDE



    4-4
    --W------M------S---------$
    --------------------------
    ----E-----N-------T-----E--
    ----------------------------
    ------1--2---3---4---5-----
    ----------------------------
    --------------6-------------

    1- END
    2- NOSE
    3- CHECKING SAM TO $
    4- TACKLE
    5- END
    6- MIKE TO WILL

    3-4- TREAT J AS IF HE WILL COME EVERYTIME
    -W-------M------S-----
    --------------------------
    ------E------N-------T--J--
    ----------------------------
    ------1--2---3---4---5-----
    ----------------------------
    --------------6-------------

    1- END
    2- TIGHTEN ALIGNMENT AND SCOOP TO NOSE WITH HELP FROM 3
    3- HELP ON NOSE, CHECKING SAM TO ANYTHING OUTSIDE
    4- FAN TO TACKLE
    5- FAN TO JACK
    6- MIKE TO WILL


    33 STACK- BACKSIDE GUARD AND CENTER WILL WORK MIDDLE STACK!
    W----R------M-------L-----$
    ----------------------------
    ------E------N-------T-------
    ----------------------------
    ------1--2---3---4---5-----
    ----------------------------
    --------------6-------------

    1- END
    2- TIGHTEN ALIGNMENT TO C, SCOOP NOSE- YOU AND C WORK MIDDLE STACK
    3- YOU AND 2 WORK MIDDLE STACK
    4- DOUBLE CHECK LOU TO $
    5- TACKLE
    6- WILL TO ANY BLITZER BACKSIDE


    Regarding mirrored routes- I have always done this for three and most 5 step combos, but there are better ways to do it (I need to become better educated in this area). If you think about it, with mirrored routes- if something happens playside, and you can't throw it, then by the time you get to backside routes, they'll be covered too. Therefore we need something that will open later backside...You should checkout some Coverdale stuff-you can find it on Coaches Choice.

    Hope this helps

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    331

    Default

    We use a full slide away from the TE, that way we can release him in his route. Every O-Linemen steps agressively to the direction of the slide. We will put our FB on the DE in 3 step drop. I know people get worked up about that, but the ball is out so fast all he has to do is attack the inside number of the DE and make him go around.

    If the ball is not out in time that is a QB issue. We threw three step 107 times last year and were never sacked. If you try to lock up big on big backside and you get a walk up LB blitz through the B or C gap the LB will be in your QB's lap before you know it.

    As far as routes we will mirror them - EX. if we call 91 we are slant/arrow on each side. (9 = slide left, 1 = route combo)

    We have gone to double calling though - for example - 913 - Slant/arrow on left and Fade on the right. We use this if we are not sure what coverage we are going to get.

    If an O-linemen has no immediate threat to his gap we will give a hand of help back, with eyes on his gap. Again that is just what we do. Oh another reason we slide away from TE is to make it a little longer edge for that DE if that makes sense

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    331

    Default

    One last thing - when throwing 3 step since the ball has to be out quick your QB picks a side to read presnap - he would read either the alley player or corner depending on route combo. He then has a simple if this than that choice on where the ball is going.

    Qb footwork if deep step, cross, plant throw.

    With that full slide we can install in 5 minutes it is good against any front, and your linemen will love it because they could care less about what the defense is doing they are being aggresive, so is you FB.

  5. #5

    Default

    I am in total agreement with TampaBay..we use a slide technique away from TE, and also release him into the pattern, getting 4 out. One little exception is our rule for the OT/FB to the TE-side. IDEALLY we want the OT to get into the last man on LOS defender to engage & cut...getting his hands down to open the throwing lane. This would require the FB to fill B-gap IMMEDIATELY. If the B-gap is threatened by a pre-aligned LB in that gap the OT will make a call to alert FB to take the DE and then the OT will take the full slide into that gap. IF we expect or have been seeing blitzing, we will make a MAX call and then the TE stays and FB goes opposite. If we see a coverage that dictates a change, we make the adjustment/audible from the sidelines. The reason we prefer to send FB away from SE is we want to get flow and eyes (if keying FB) away from the prefered side we want to attack.

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